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What do you think is killing the Bees?

6 Answers
Cell phones, pesticides? Are you concerned? Are you doing anything to try to save the bees?
P

Yes, I've read about this and I've heard segments about this on television, maybe the Discovery channel. It is referred to as colony collapse disorder (which I just had to look up to remind myself). What happens is that so many bees in a hive just die suddenly, and the remaining bees abandon the hive.

This is a serious problem, like you mentioned, because we rely on bees. This is also happening with professional bee keepers.

Although this has been recently noticed in the last five years or so, I had noticed this nearly ten years ago--not about the hives, but about "sick bees".

We have a pond with quite a bit of flowers near our home, and we also have jasmine in our yard. Both of these attract bees. I had started noticing bees that were flying funny, either having a hard time flying or being dazed and confused not knowing where they were going.

In 2003, I was standing outside near the pond talking to my brother and my husband. I spotted one. I said, "Oh, crap, it's one of those sick bees." My brother looked at me like I was crazy, especially when I suggested we run so it didn't sting us.

So, while my brother is standing there laughing at me, the bee lands on my shirt. One second the bee was flying one way, the next second it is flying towards me and lands. Of course, I flip out and try to flick it off. I get stung.

I have NEVER been allergic to bee stings. My entire hand swelled up in less than 24 hours, the pain was excruciating. I was on prednisone for three weeks. And then the skin on my hand, literally, began to peel off. This, three weeks after being bit by a sick bee.

Incidentally, it was around this same time that my husband began to encounter swarms of bees while at work--he is in construction. It happened quite frequently, and still does. What are the chances of encountering a swarm of bees every few months since 2003, while he had never encountered this before (working in the field since 1995)?

Today, I encounter a sick bee at least once a day. Just flying around near the glass sliding door not knowing where the heck it is going, flying into the walls of the house, going one way one second and another way the next, landing on the ground and unable to get into the air again, etc.

Scientists are still clueless as to what is causing this problem--colony collapse disorder. There are only guesses like the radiation from cell phones, a combination of pesticides, a combination of viruses, etc.

Perhaps it is the cell phone theory. I noticed the sick bees in 2003, and that's when I noticed cell phone usage go up, too.

But, if we don't know what the cause is, there is nothing that anyone can do. Would people stop using their cell phones if it was determined to be the cause? I'm not quite sure. I don't have a cell phone, but I do run from sick bees.

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A

This is terribly concerning to me. I have been in my home for about three years, and while we have no shortage of wasps, yellow jackets, and hornets, I might see ONE or TWO bees during an entire summer. Even if I had never heard news of the bee issue, it would have been really strange to me that I rarely see a bee. There was one in my home a few weeks ago that was flying around in circles looking sick. I found it strange because, first off, it's pretty cold around here now, and second I had seen maybe only one bee all summer, so why would it be here now, in the cold?

We planted pumpkins a few years ago, and although the vines grew really long and the yellow flowers budded, there were no bees to pollinate the female flowers, so no pumpkins ever grew.

I have a plan to help, but my plans usually stay just plans, and never pan out. I would really like to have a bird and bee friendly garden. I've started off by planting ornamental grass and daisies, but stopped there. Hopefully next spring I can follow through and make it super bee friendly.

So now I have a question which I will probably post separately: WHy is it that whatever is killing bees isn't killing hornets and wasps? They seem to be in plentiful abundance.

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A

Many people are kiling the bees here they are afraid of them in California and the large cities leastways. They can be dangerous. There was the scare before of the killer bees. I was always told to leave the honeybees alone as they were harmless unless bothered. I was a bit scared of the African bees but it seems to have come to not much. There is just so much pesticide and all around. I think people do realize they need them at least for honey. But people in the city like LA see it as being a national emergency if bees are around. They haven't really seen any before and act like that with everything. I don't know where you are exactly and what is happening there. But with pollution and all it affects things, living beings.

I had some sick bees trying to get in my window in Texas. I think someone sprayed them though. I felt bad about it.

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H

I have been aware of this a couple of years back, but I did not know the bees are declining day by day or year by year. I assumed that if mobile phones are killing off the bees, then they should stop erecting too many mobile phones masts in the countryside or in a large open field where insects such as bees are roaming. Because of human greed, this is what is happening to nature, animals and insects are suffering while humans are enjoying the pleasure of technology. I just hope more bees are reproducing otherwise it will be a disaster.

The scientist who said that without bees human lifespan will decrease was Albert Einstein. This is what he quoted - "If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe, then man would only have four years of life left". This does sound pretty concerning doesn't it?

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M

This has been in the news for the past 2-3 years at least. Bees are declining. Great fears because without bees who will pollinate most of the plants? Some scientists warn that without bees humans will only live 5 years because not only do we depend on certain plants for our survival, but many food animals (cattle eat alfalfa) do too.

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H

Oh my goodness, don't tell me the bees are becoming extinct in this world. Who's going to produce honey without them? Where did you hear this don't mind me asking?

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