S

If "heat rises," does "cold sink?"

6 Answers
Just wondering.
N

Well strictly speaking Cold doesn't 'really' exist. BUT, if we give 'something' a name,define it, and can predict it's properties (even if just through the 'opposite' of heat' in a manner of speaking, it does exist. We have created it an an entity of our own human construction, have we not?

Is 'cold' not but precisely the lack of heat?

I can use a sentence properly that involves my arm getting colder. In theory heat could eb proven to NOT exist in the exact same context! Could it be that maximum temperature (absolute heat) couls not be a BASELINE value from which coldness INCREASES. This is not that far of a stretch, assuming one has some degree of neuroplacicity left in that cerebral cortex we have in our heads!

Seeing as how the entire world is nothing more than a subjective experience, I don't believe that anyone could effectively argue against this point.

I have no independent objective proof that any of your are but figments of my imagination, so I think I can

This is just my own unique and fresh, BUT VERY MUCH REAL perspective of cold.

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P

Firstly there is no such thing as "cold". Heat is the amount of kinetic energy in a solid, liquid, or gas. Molecules can vibrate in a solid, and slide over each other in a liquid, and in a gas such as air, they have the greatest amount of freedom. They can vibrate, rapidly rotate, or translate which means that they whiz all over the place. The higher the speed of motion, the greater the temperature. When air gets hot, it expands. This causes it to become less dense for a given mass of air. This results in it becoming more buoyant and makes it rise in the same way that a helium balloon will rise, a ship will float or oil rises to the surface of water. This is how moisture laden air rises and clouds are formed. When air becomes cold i.e. it's molecules have less kinetic energy and consequentially the temperature is lower, it becomes less dense and sinks. So on a cold night or morning, moisture laden air can roll down into a valley forming fog. This process also happens on a larger scale and results in the formation of low and high pressure weather systems.

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A

Heat is a form of energy. It doesn't rise or sink. It can be transferred to a cooler body in contact with a warmer body.

Hot air rises because it floats on cooler air which is more dense. Similarly cold air will sink since it is even more dense. Similarly for liquids. Generally speaking warm liquids are less dense than cool ones and will rise, whereas cold liquids will sink. Some liquids like water have a density that is maximum at around 4 degrees Celsius. Below that temperature water is less dense and will tend to float on the warmer 4 degree water. Ice, which is frozen water, and colder than liquid water, is even less dense and will float to the top of a body of water. Would you say then that cold rises?

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S

No. Heat rises because there are only three types of matter. Solid, liquid, gas. Gas contains heat. Liquid, when heated turns into gas and gas moves, rising turning into evaporation. When it is cold it turn into a solid it does not sink it just doesn't move

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S

No. Heat rises because there are only three types of matter. Solid, liquid, gas. Gas contains heat. Liquid, when heated turns into gas and gas moves, rising turning into evaporation. When it is cold it turn into a solid it does not sink it just doesn't move

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I

Yes a person can willingly make their body 32 degrees by relaxing and letting yourself sink/drop and fall into place. The purpose of this you ask, well to be like "Hancock" yea the drunk super hero.

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