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How many legs does an Octopus have?

7 Answers
hi members a question about: how many legs does an octopus have?,please quickly, thanks
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Wow, I'm glad we got that all cleared up! It's "Crystal clear" now!

I was simply offering an opinion. Perhaps an appropriate reference source would clarify the confusion. But since I doubt anyone else will take the time...

Websters New World Dictionary - Collage ed., states that an 'octopus' is a soft sac-like mollusk, with a large head and eight ARMS covered with "suckers". However, The origin of the word comes from the Greek word 'octopodus' (eight footed). However, once again, an 'octopod' (derived from the Greek word...yep, you guessed it...'octopodus') is defined directly above the fist definition as a eight-LIMBED animal, specifically the 'octopus'!

So I believe that the Greeks were a bit confused whilst naming these creatures! I propose we cut them some slack though.

But I should reiterate that these organisms do not walk, so they need no legs. They do, however, need to grab things for motility and food collection / consumption, hence the arms reference I previously suggested fits most appropriately using common-sense, or so it is my opinion!

Thanks, and "Cheers"!

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Thank you, Boatal18 for the clarification. And as to your "hexopus" mutanttheory, I get it and all - but I wouldn't alter every mutants' name or phylogeny just because it "popped out" deformed in some way. If it is fit enough to survive or have an advantage over the eight armed octopus, then I would say it's close to being a unique species, requiring a novel identification. But it would have to be capable of mating and producing viable offspring! Not an easy task when you a one of a kind mutated organism, especially in light of the fact the people are trying to roast you up for dinner!

But then, and I believe only then, would it acquire a unique species name and most fitting would certainly be a "hexopus" or a "hexapus"! (I think that "hex(a)-" would replace "oct(o)-" as the prefix changing the second "o" to an "a"), but technically the discoverer could name it whatever (s)he wanted.

I guess if a new species emerged without tentacles it might be called a "nilopus", sounds about right, don't you think?!

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An octopus has eight arms, not legs and not tentacles. Tentacles have suckers only at the ends of the appendage; an octopus has suckers throughout the length of each arm. Tentacles are generally longer than arms as well. Although an octopus' limbs are often misidentified as tentacles, they are indeed arms.

Recently an octopus made the news for having just six arms. A couple caught the creature while fishing and didn't realize until they were attempting to have it cooked up for their supper that it was a genetic rarity. Since the word "octopus" is based on the Greek "octo" for "eight," it challenges the species' very name -- a six-armed octopus would be more appropriately referred to as a hexopus, wouldn't it?

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Do octopuses have legs? I was under the impression that they had tentacles. And why would you expect them to be "legs" and not "arms" if you had to categorize them as one or the other? Most creatures don't use legs for gripping and squeezing so much as their arm-like appendages (at least not in public).

So I would say that an octopus has zero legs. I would venture to say it has zero arms, too. An octopus has eight (8) tentacles.

That's my opinion anyways!

Thanks!

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It is named Octopus also to describe the number of legs it has. Octopus has 8 legs. They are known as tentacles. Often also a part of monsters in most games.

Like someone has already mentioned above Octo means 8 in Greek as well as Math.

Cheers.

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C

An octopus has 8 legs, hence the beginning of the word octo, which means 8. A squid has 6 legs so an octopus is bigger/bulkier.

Hope I helped! Have a great day!

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An octopus has 8 legs.

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