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Why is it everywhere I look it says ovulation occurs before a period? It doesn't make sense

12 Answers
Why is it everywhere I look it says ovulation occurs before a period? It doesn't make sense
S

What doesn't make sense about it to you?

Ovulation is the release of a mature egg or ova from an ovary. Ovulation is necessary in order for pregnancy to occur. After the egg is released it travels down the fallopian tube.

If the egg does not become fertiziled by a spermatozoa it passes out of the body. Every month the lining of the uterus thickens in preparation to receive a fertilized egg if you become pregnant. Since you have not become pregnant the lining of the uterus is no longer necessary. It is shed in a flow of blood known as your menstruation or period.

If fertilization occurs the egg implants itself in the uterus and you do not have a period. If you became pregnant and still shed the uterine lining you would shed the growing embryo too.

Do you understand now? This is the series of events: Your uterine lining thickens in preparation to receive a fertilized egg. An egg is released which is ovulation. The egg does not become fertilized and passes from the body. Your period begins as the now unnecessary uterine lining is shed. After your period is over the uterine lining, again, thickens to receive a fertilized egg...

Edit: For the purposes of this question it doesn't matter which day is officially the first day of your cycle. It only matters ovulation occurs prior to your period.

Women would have nothing to shed with their very first menstruation if the uterine lining didn't thickened first. The first day of your period is considered the first day of your cycle because it is the first event that could be identified. There was nothing to mark the changed in the uterus.

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P

When do you think ovulation occurs?

A woman's cycle starts with day 1...the first day of her period. The uterus sheds any lining it has accumulated, if no fertilized egg has been implanted.

Somewhere approximately in the middle of the cycle, ovulation, which is an egg being released from the ovary, occurs, which travels down the Fallopian tube. If it meets any sperm, and gets fertilized, it travels down and implants in the uterine wall a few days later.

If it does not meet any sperm, it does not get fertilized. A few days later, the uterus then sheds it's lining again, beginning the cycle all over.

So, a woman's cycle is: day 1, first day of period; then ovulation (day 14 on a 28 day cycle...usually); then period again. The last day of a woman's cycle is the day before she starts bleeding again.

The answer above that has it happening both before AND after is a bit inaccurate. Ovulation occurs only once during a woman's cycle, or at least how a woman's cycle should be counted and is counted if you're either trying to get pregnant or think you are. That answer gives you no information that puts ovulation in the proper place in your cycle.

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Ovulation occurs smack dab in the middle of your cycle. The first day of your 28 day menstrual cycle begins on the FIRST day of your period. Ovulation occurs 14 days after the first day of your period. ( 2 weeks). There is an eight day fertility window beginning four days before ovulation and ending three days after, with your ovulation date in the middle.

2 weeks after your ovulation date, a new cycle begins with the first day of your period.
Many women get confused and think that pregnancy begins on the day she conceived, but that isn't so. The 40 weeks of pregnancy is calculated from the first day of the menstrual cycle, which is the first day of your period. Normal gestation period for a baby is 38 weeks, but when you add the two weeks from your period to conception, that is 40 weeks and how the doctor can calculate the due date.

The period occurs 2 weeks BEFORE ovulation and 2 weeks AFTER ovulation.

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D

Assuming a 28-day cycle, ovulation occurs on approximately day 14 (on average). If the released egg does not become fertilized by sperm (and in turn successfully implanted into the lining of the uterus), the unfertilized egg and uterine lining will then be shed in the form of a period. That said, a period occurs after ovulation, should successful fertilization and implantation of the egg not occur (i.e., ovulation occurs before a period, it will lead to a period if the egg is not fertilized).

If you wish to track your cycle, consider day 1 to be the first day of your last menstrual period. Approximately 14 days following this (assuming a 28-day cycle), ovulation will occur. Not all women have a 28-day cycle, many will vary from this. What is a normal cycle for you may be different. If you have any questions or concerns regarding your health, speak with your doctor. All the best!

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A

Your period would come after ovulation because the egg was not fertilized, therefore there is no need for the uterine lining that was formed to permit fertility around the time of ovulation, therefore you body has to rid itself of the lining and hence you have your period. It is much less likely to get pregnant during your period because of this.

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R

Ovulation is where the egg is released from the ovaries and begins to make it's way down the fallopian tube. It usually occurs 12 to 14 days before your period starts. So, it's not until 12 to 14 days later that your period starts and the egg leaves your body with some of the uterus lining that sheds at that time as well.

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B

It makes perfect sense. A period comes because conception did not take place, and the eggs that have not been fertilized are gotten rid of. Then, the cycle starts all over again; some time in the middle of your cycle, you'll begin ovulating again.

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S

It happens both before, and after... Approximately 2 weeks before you start your period, then approxmiately 2 weeks after you start your period. You ovulate every month, once per cycle, approximately right between the start of each period.

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S

I didn't necessarily get that impression. I just wanted to make sure I didn't say something that was being misunderstood. I don't want to provide inaccurate information, albeit unintentionally.

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P
See this answer to one of your other questions. I think you're more confused over terms than when you ovulated/conceived.

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No, not you. I was asking the original poster. Sorry if you got the impression I meant you.

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S

Carol, are you referring to my answer? Did I word something so it is misleading?

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