G

What similarities are there among grain sorghum (milo), amaranth, and quinoa?

6 Answers
From a botanical point of view.
C
Genius81 I think I've got the point of your question finally! I mentioned that amaranth and quinoa were psuedograins, unlike sorghum, which is a grain. Amaranth and quinoa are definitely related as far as genetically concerned, and they grow in similar parts of the world.

Both amaranth and quinoa are in the order Caryophyllales and family Amaranthaceae. The genus and species are different, but having the same family make them very closely related.

Sorghum, on the other hand, is from the order Poales and family Poaceae. The family Poaceae contains wheat, rice, millet, and corn and other "true" grasses. This family is one of the most common plants families on the planet and can be found around the globe.

...
L

Quinoa is a cold season crop best where temperatures do not exceed 90 degrees F. Amaranth and sorghum, however, are warm season crops.
From a nutritional standpoint, quinoa and amaranth both contain about 16 percent protein, E and B vitamins, calcium, iron and phosphorous. They are easy to digest and wonderful in flavor. Because they are not true cereal grains they can be eaten by people who suffer from cereal grain allergies. Sorghum is a cereal grain. Amaranth is often ground into flour. Quinoa has gluten. Amaranth and sorghum, however, is gluten free. Quinoa and Amaranth are more native to South America while Sorghum is more native to Africa-Egypt. I hope this helps. If you need more info, please let me know. Good luck! growing these crops result in such a yummy experience on your kitchen table. I wasn't sure how to edit my answer so I just re did it.

...
L

Quinoa is a cold season crop best where temperatures do not exceed 90 degrees F. Amaranth and sorghum, however, are warm season crops.
From a nutritional standpoint, quinoa and amaranth both contain about 16 percent protein, E and B vitamins, calcium, iron and phosphorous. They are easy to digest and wonderful in flavor. Because they are not true cereal grains they can be eaten by people who suffer from cereal grain allergies. Sorghum is a cereal grain. Amaranth is often ground into flour because it contains more gluten than quinoa. Sorghum, however, is gluten free. Quinoa and Amaranth are more native to South America while Sorghum is more native to Africa-Egypt. I hope this helps. If you need more info, please let me know. Good luck! growing these crops result in such a yummy experience on your kitchen table

...
G

Thank you so much, Lixxli88 for answering this question. It's been out here for a while. I might have not been too clear on what I was after, about the botanic connection. I was looking for the roots of how these plants might be related, according to current nomenclature systems in the botany discipline...my bad for not making that clear.

But meanwhile, I must say that amaranth has no gluten, unless it's processed in a plant that also processes wheat and other grains that contain gluten.

I'd like very much for you to modify your answer, and I can then modify my comment.

...
C

Amaranth and quinoa are considered to be pseudograins, which means they have some similarities to grain and can be ground into flour like a grain. Sorghum is a grain, which means its a species of grass. Even though sorghum is a grass, it is considered to be gluten free.

All three are gluten free, but the non-grasses usually have a broader spectrum of amino acids. Quinoa and sorghum are good sources of protien as they have good proportions of amino acids compatable with human needs.

...
L

I'm sorry, all three are gluten free and I'm unable to edit my answer until I have more activity on my account.

...