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If the Moon moves and affects tides is it possible that it also affects the liquids in our bodies?

7 Answers
90% of our bodies are made of fluids and liquid.
J

I can only answer with a story often told by my mother. She was an RN and department supervisor at a local psychiatric hospital. An incident report is a report filed when an unusual incident occurs with a patient. The number of incident reports filed nearly doubled around the new and full moons over the monthly overall average by days. This would seem to indicate that the moon does have some effect on people and could have some bearing on the origins of the term 'lunatic'. Whether it's due to the effect on liquids in our bodies or not is still open to debate.

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N

I think you question is actually quite interesting, even if examined purely from a conceptual basis. Our current understanding of gravity and all it's possible effects, is not quite as clear as we tend to believe it to be. Albert Einstein was the first person to truly put a lot of successful thought into the matter of gravitational force from an objective point-of-view. His description of gravity has survived the scrutiny of the scientific community, in general, for a very long time.

Gravity is one of the four fundamental forces of the universe, with the others being electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. It is generally believed to be unique in that it is not based on the attraction/repulsion forces of other particles as the other three fundamental forces are, but instead it's an intrinsic property of space-time itself. Denser, masses bend the "fabric" of space-time with higher intensity causing other matter to be attracted as a function of it's own mass and density.

Gravity is the weakest of the four known forces, and it's intensity decreases very quickly with distance. This is generally the basis for saying that your body's aqueous fluids will not be affected by the moon, The moon is not particularly large or dense, compared to Earth for instance, and it is very far away, so the effects are present, yet nearly unmeasurable. Since there is no specific boundary with which a force ends, or is asymptotic to, it's effects technically fill the entire universe. Additionally since gravity is not energy or particulate based, it's effects are experienced immediately, as the "universal speed limit" of light is not applicable. So technically, no matter how insignificant it may be in strength, you are being pulled in every direction by everything in the universe that has any mass whatsoever, at all times and it varies as a function of everything's movements!

It appears that even if you were to take into account the additive effects of all these minuscule forces, even if we added in a ridiculous idea such that all matter of the universe is to your left, while the universe may be infinite, every massive particle that can act on you is at an increasing distance location Therefore, there must be an exponentially weaker gravitational effect exhibited on you. So as the addition of the set of gravitational force vectors approachs infinity, their strength exerted on you decreases with a faster rate! There would seem to never be an appreciable force possible unless you were relatively very massive or close to an object. Of course the word appreciable is such a subjective term, it is all but impossible to define from a objective standpoint, just like the words big, long, happy, or similar, (see "the Heap paradox"). Maybe the effects are not seen when the water is observed because it is truly not affected, but it's also possible that we simply can't measure or understand the effect with out current "understanding" of the universe!

We believe that we know a great deal about our surroundings, but if you examine any moment from the past, we have always believed that we knew enormously more than what we actually did. Science seems to be notorious for forgetting about this concept. We KNEW the earth was flat, until we questioned it. And we KNEW that atoms were indivisible until we thought it was worth trying to divide one anyway. So it naturally follows that our knowledge at present will seem silly in a century, or a millennium! To put it in perspective we can turn back a mere century at a quote from one of our greatest physicists, Lord Kelvin, who said ""Radio has no future. Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible. X-rays will prove to be a hoax." I think we can safely say, that we're never as smart as we think we are.

Gravity has always been a thorn on the side of theoretical physicists trying designing any kind of universal theory that holds true at all known locations, times, and events. A quantum gravity theory has recently been developed using a hypothetical, made-up quantum particle called a graviton, more as a mathematical "placeholder" than anything else. Since it's proposal and integration into theory, the graviton has been experimentally confirmed to exist! Are the tests, incorrect, or do we need to make changes to accommodate such a previously unknown entity? Only time will tell. But it certainly has challenged our prior foundations of understanding gravity.

So now we can revisit the question of if there could be changes, even at the cellular level, from such low-levels of gravity, such as that produced by the moon. One might answer that methodically, by realizing water, or even cellular components, display properties of their constituent building blocks. So for water that's the elements hydrogen and oxygen. Likewise the statistical probability of interactions between elements is due to movements and so-called "luck" of where an electron happens to be at any given time, and the angle with which two elements collide. These are all based on their constituents as well. Are quantum particles ultimately affected in any way by such low-levels of gravity? It certainly would be MORE likely than any aforementioned higher magnitude of organization.

Might changes occur at such a level, as simple as the change in a quantum particle's properties? If so, there's a logical basis to see the effect propagate back up the hierarchy to the molecular or even the cellular level. There's no experimentally determined changes like this, at least none that have held up to the scrutiny of the scientific communities as of yet, but this does not mean much, aside from discouraging research in the area. Who will find research, or waste their time on such ideas, when any proof will all but surely be ignored by anyone of "significance" in science? Undoubtedlly, very few.

I'm certainly no conspiracy theorist, but as they say, is it truely paranoia if they really are out to get you?! Name one major scientific achievement that didn't come from someone who though differently than the rest of mainstream science, or "out of the box" in some way! I'm sure they do exist, but they seem to be mere anomalies by comparison to the "big picture".

Ultimately the answer goes something like this: "No, we don't believe in that now, but we've never been right before. But this time were VERY confident!" So take from all this what you will, but I believe it's somewhat of a rather accurate description of the reason that one would answer "No."

Thanks for the interesting question!

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D

No.Tides are as a result of a difference in gravitational pull of the earth and that of the moon.The gravitational effect of the moon on water is very very minimal on other large water bodies other than the sea.The tidal effect for example of the moon on Lake Victoria and the Great Lakes only creates tides of 2 inches so I highly doubt if the moon has any noticable effect on the water in our bodies.

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S

Not really, its such a small body of water which being pumped around anyway. Even if it is affecting the water in our bodies, what is it doing to it? So what if its moving it from side to side, whatever that means. Why should the movement of water within our bodies affect our mood in any way?
I think it's bollocks.

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S

No It can not affect the liquid in the body. Gravitation is a very weak force. You need a huge amount of water like seas in order to have a visible affect. Strictly speaking It has an affect to your body but it is so tiny that you can't even measure it.

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A

I know from myself my favorite time in night diving is when it is a full moon. Not only is there better visibility, I feel much more energetic!

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A

If the moon's gravity is so strong that it makes the Earth wobble then how come it does not affect us!?

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